Autism Spectrum

Launchpad

leaving school and leading your own life

Work

 

There are many different pathways into the workplace and many good options to get you on the right track after school.

Many of you will opt to take up some of the government-funded Post School Options programs.  Click here for information on these options.

Alternatively, some young people choose to study full-time. Others may do a mixture of work and study organised by themselves.

Some will take up an apprenticeship or traineeship.

Others may start to work full time straight away, either with some funded assistance or by finding a job for themselves.

It’s worth getting to know about all the options as you may need to refer back to this section over the next few years.

 

You have got 60 years of adult life so you don’t want to be wasting a day of it.

Martin Wren, CEO of Nova Employment

 

Please note, if you are Aboriginal and/or from a non-English speaking background then it is always worth letting all your service providers know. They may be able to offer specific services where these are available.

Have you already downloaded the excellent Top Tips booklet from the Get Ready For Study and Work website?

If not, you will benefit from doing that now.

You can also read this blog post by Graeme Innes for some great tips on getting a job.

 

JobTips

The JobTips website  is worth getting to know. It has information about career advice, finding and keeping a job and maintaining successful work relationships.

Even though JobTips needs a subscription to view most of its content you can sign up to try some sections at no cost.

It may be possible to access JobTips as part of a Transition To Work program, or it might be worth asking your school careers officer to subscribe.

 

Books about employment

Employment For Individuals With Asperger Syndrome or Non-Verbal Learning Disability : Stories and Strategies by Yvona Fast

Developing Talents: Careers for Individuals with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism by Temple Grandin

Different . . . Not Less: Inspiring Stories of Achievement and Successful Employment from Adults with Autism by Temple Grandin

Growing Up On The Spectrum, Koegel and LaZebnik

Preparing For Life by Jed Baker

Asperger Syndrome Employment Workbook by Roger Meyer

The Hidden Curriculum of Getting and Keeping A Job by Myles, Endow and Mayfield

aspect

 

Work

 

There are many different pathways into the workplace and many good options to get you on the right track after school.

Many of you will opt to take up some of the government-funded Post School Options programs.  Click here for information on these options.

Alternatively, some young people choose to study full-time. Others may do a mixture of work and study organised by themselves.

Some will take up an apprenticeship or traineeship.

Others may start to work full time straight away, either with some funded assistance or by finding a job for themselves.

It’s worth getting to know about all the options as you may need to refer back to this section over the next few years.

 

You have got 60 years of adult life so you don’t want to be wasting a day of it.

Martin Wren, CEO of Nova Employment

 

Please note, if you are Aboriginal and/or from a non-English speaking background then it is always worth letting all your service providers know. They may be able to offer specific services where these are available.

Have you already downloaded the excellent Top Tips booklet from the Get Ready For Study and Work website?

If not, you will benefit from doing that now.

You can also read this blog post by Graeme Innes for some great tips on getting a job.

 

JobTips

The JobTips website  is worth getting to know. It has information about career advice, finding and keeping a job and maintaining successful work relationships.

Even though JobTips needs a subscription to view most of its content you can sign up to try some sections at no cost.

It may be possible to access JobTips as part of a Transition To Work program, or it might be worth asking your school careers officer to subscribe.

 

Books about employment

Employment For Individuals With Asperger Syndrome or Non-Verbal Learning Disability : Stories and Strategies by Yvona Fast

Developing Talents: Careers for Individuals with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism by Temple Grandin

Different . . . Not Less: Inspiring Stories of Achievement and Successful Employment from Adults with Autism by Temple Grandin

Growing Up On The Spectrum, Koegel and LaZebnik

Preparing For Life by Jed Baker

Asperger Syndrome Employment Workbook by Roger Meyer

The Hidden Curriculum of Getting and Keeping A Job by Myles, Endow and Mayfield

aspect

 


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Work

 

We would all like to see our children getting a job that gives them satisfaction and broadens their social connections.

Some young people living with autism are able to obtain employment with minimal assistance.

However the vast majority will need support to find and maintain suitable employment.

 

This support can come from a variety of sources.

The various state and territory governments provide funded programs for eligible young people with disabilities transitioning from school to work.

You can more about these Post School Options here.

Other young people will be supported by a Disability Employment Service - a free service to help job seekers find and maintain employment.

Read more about Disability Employment Services here.

For some young people with autism who have higher support needs, a supported employment setting may be more suitable. Have a look at our section on supported employment here. 

You will also find sections on career advice, finding a job, part-time employment, volunteer work, self-employment and workplace skills.

These sections contain lots of practical tips and strategies.

They also include inspiring personal stories from young people who have navigated their way into fulfilling roles in the workplace.

Another excellent resource you and your young person should check out is the Get Ready For Study and Work website.

This blog post by Graeme Innes also has some great tips for getting a job.

 

How Parents' Role Changes 

There's a very sobering, yet ultimately hopeful article about how our role as parents changes as our sons and daughters enter the website on the Guardian website here.

Here's a quote from it:

“Parents of young people with Asperger’s need employers to know that, with the right support, our children can be an incredible asset not a hindrance. It’s easy for an employer to say it’s not working out, but at what cost? The loss of a potentially brilliant employee?


As a friend of mine, faced with a similar situation, said: “It’s all or nothing They will either excel in an environment that rewards (and accepts) their skills and behaviours or they will spend their lives on benefits; there’s no in-between”.


Our job as parents is to prepare our children for the world. This takes a little longer when you have a child with high-functioning autism but at some point we also need to step back and let go, hoping that everything you have done to prepare them for the world of work has sunk in (while still being prepared to be there to catch them if they fall).” 

 

Useful Resources

JobTips

The JobTips website  is also worth getting to know. This is a comprehensive resource for career advice, finding and keeping a job and maintaining successful work relationships.

JobTips charges an annual subscription to access it’s webpages, videos and worksheets but you can sign up to try some sections at no cost.

It may be possible to access JobTips as part of a Transition To Work program, or it might be worth asking your school careers officer to subscribe.

 

Books

Employment For Individuals With Asperger Syndrome or Non-Verbal Learning Disability : Stories and Strategies by Yvona Fast

Developing Talents: Careers for Individuals with Asperger Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism by Temple Grandin Ph.D.

Different . . . Not Less: Inspiring Stories of Achievement and Successful Employment from Adults with Autism by Temple Grandin PhD

Growing Up On The Spectrum by Lynn Koegel and Claire LaZebnik

Preparing For Life by Jed Baker

Asperger Syndrome Employment Workbook by Roger Meyer

 

 

 
Video from Aspect's A Different Brilliant campaign