Autism Spectrum

Launchpad

leaving school and leading your own life

Social life 

 

Leaving school can mean big changes in your social life.

At school you are with the same people five days a week. Once you leave school, you might be in several places over the course of the week and it may be harder to make friends.

Past bad experiences may mean you are reluctant to make new friends.

Some young adults on the autism spectrum experience feelings of anxiety when interacting with others in social settings.

Some may find social interaction very tiring and need more alone time to recharge afterwards.

It can be harder for those on the spectrum to overcome some of the challenges around making and keeping friends.

However there are skills that you can learn and practice to help you.

In this section, you'll find ideas about where to make friends. There are also tips and personal stories about maintaining your social life and managing any problems that may arise.

For a quick overview on developing social skills have a look at this summary on the National Autistic Society UK website.

 

 

 

 

 

 Social life 

 

 

 

Leaving school and moving into the adult world can mean big changes in your son or daughter's social life.

At school they are are with the same people five days a week.

Once they leave school, they might be in several places over the course of the week and it can be harder to make friends.

They will be faced with new kinds of social relationships that have their own set of rules and conventions.

Your child may not be aware of  workplace etiquette, the rules of dating and romantic relationships and other complex social matters.

They are likely to have struggled to make friends in the past and may well have had many negative social experiences.

In addition, some young people on the autism spectrum experience feelings of anxiety when interacting with others in social settings.

You may be concerned that your son or daughter on the spectrum may not be interested in making friends.

In this section you'll find ideas about helping your son or daughter find and make new friends after school.

We will also outline some strategies and resources relating to the social rules and conventions surrounding adult relationships.

For a quick overview on developing social skills have a look at this summary on the National Autistic Society UK website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Social life 

 

 

 

Leaving school and moving into the adult world can mean big changes in your son or daughter's social life.

At school they are are with the same people five days a week.

Once they leave school, they might be in several places over the course of the week and it can be harder to make friends.

They will be faced with new kinds of social relationships that have their own set of rules and conventions.

Your child may not be aware of  workplace etiquette, the rules of dating and romantic relationships and other complex social matters.

They are likely to have struggled to make friends in the past and may well have had many negative social experiences.

In addition, some young people on the autism spectrum experience feelings of anxiety when interacting with others in social settings.

You may be concerned that your son or daughter on the spectrum may not be interested in making friends.

In this section you'll find ideas about helping your son or daughter find and make new friends after school.

We will also outline some strategies and resources relating to the social rules and conventions surrounding adult relationships.

For a quick overview on developing social skills have a look at this summary on the National Autistic Society UK website.