Autism Spectrum

Launchpad

leaving school and leading your own life

Advocacy and disclosure 

 

In this section of the website we look at how young people with autism can stick up for themselves, the technical term is self-advocacy.

 

What is advocacy?

Advocacy is the process of ensuring that your human and legal rights are promoted and protected so that you can participate fully in your community. 

A self-advocate is someone with a disability who is able to speak up and represent themselves.

Disability Advocacy Resource Unit website

 

The National Disability Advocacy Program

There is now a website which lists the disability advocacy services which are funded by the Commonwealth government. This is not a full list of all services available, just those funded federally.

National Disability Advocacy Program website here

 The NDAP has a very useful 30 minute video - you can watch it here.

 

NSW-funded advocacy services

In NSW, Family & Community Services, Ageing, Disability and Home Care have a list of the advocacy and information services funded by the NSW government. Find it here.

 

Disclosure

We also look at the thorny issue of whether young people are better off telling people about their autism spectrum or not.

There are lots of things for you to think about over the years, check out the pages on the left to get started.

 

 

Advocacy and disclosure 

 

Ideally your son or daughter will learn to advocate for themselves as they grow older.

This is called self-advocacy and it’s an idea that has really taken off in the past few years.

Our section for young people gives them tools for getting started with self-advocacy and planning their own life.

Families of young people need to think about these issues too, as you might need to discuss them with your son or daughter or person you care for.

Sometimes your advice might be very much needed.

In other cases families and carers will be the ones who do most of the advocacy that is required.

In this Parent section we give you ideas on how to approach sticking up for your son or daughter and where to find extra help and advice when you need it.

 

 

The National Disability Advocacy Program

There is now a website which lists the disability advocacy services which are funded by the Commonwealth government. This is not a full list of all services available, just those funded federally.

National Disability Advocacy Program website here

 The NDAP has a very useful 30 minute video - you can watch it here.

 

NSW-funded advocacy services

In NSW, Family & Community Services, Ageing, Disability and Home Care have a list of the advocacy and information services funded by the NSW government. Find it here.

 

Advocacy and disclosure 

 

Ideally your son or daughter will learn to advocate for themselves as they grow older.

This is called self-advocacy and it’s an idea that has really taken off in the past few years.

Our section for young people gives them tools for getting started with self-advocacy and planning their own life.

Families of young people need to think about these issues too, as you might need to discuss them with your son or daughter or person you care for.

Sometimes your advice might be very much needed.

In other cases families and carers will be the ones who do most of the advocacy that is required.

In this Parent section we give you ideas on how to approach sticking up for your son or daughter and where to find extra help and advice when you need it.

 

 

The National Disability Advocacy Program

There is now a website which lists the disability advocacy services which are funded by the Commonwealth government. This is not a full list of all services available, just those funded federally.

National Disability Advocacy Program website here

 The NDAP has a very useful 30 minute video - you can watch it here.

 

NSW-funded advocacy services

In NSW, Family & Community Services, Ageing, Disability and Home Care have a list of the advocacy and information services funded by the NSW government. Find it here.